Tag Archive | talent management

Untapped

Folks might ask: why is the consultant here?  There are people on the inside who can do it just as good, if not better, but for whatever reason, are not being asked to do so, are going untapped.

A consultant might work for us in various roles:

  • Responsible Contributor – extra pairs of hands, more human resource to complement our efforts, responsible for specific deliverables under our management.
  • Responsible Leader – someone to orchestrate, manage, lead; an adult who can manage up and down, and sideways, navigate through an event, a project, a program, or one of the other many flavors of initiative we’ve got going.
  • Expert, Subject Matter Specialist – a domain master, specialist in some aspect of technology or architecture or market or channel or industry

And while the extra hands, personality, and mind, of the 3rd party you’ve brought in, might indeed be an asset, know that there might be some of the Untapped who are potentially seeing it a bit differently.

An extra pair of hands can clutter the workbench and cutting boards of proud craftsmen and master chefs.  An extra personality can upstage both aspiring and accomplished thespians.  And who needs more than our 1 resident guru?

Keep your team tapped.  Manage your talent.  Grow from within by regularly immersing your people in the outside.  Be candid in why you’ve had to bring in a 3rd party.  Be sensitive to the reasons why you’ve had to do so; these are clues to where you might be lacking in your own capabilities to manage, grow, and empower internal talent.

This New Yorker cartoon is paid for and used under Non-Exclusive license agreement with Condé Nast.
Cartoonist: Charles Barsotti, The New Yorker Collection

© Michael C. Simonelli, onthegocio.com, 2013

1-Minute Assessment: Organizational Learning

Take today’s 1-minute assessment:

  1. Do you identify your organization’s strategic learning needs?
  2. Do you tie your learning strategy to resource planning and to talent management?
  3. Do you have a tactical plan for organizational learning?
  4. Do you consider the needs of your 3rd parties in your learning strategy and plans?
  5. Do you indeed deliver the required learning?
  6. Do you assess the learning’s effectiveness?
  7. Do you consider your Learning Organization a chief lever to pull for managing effective change?

Did you answer NO to any of these questions?  If so, you probably should consider if you are succeeding in developing the skills and knowledge of your people, so that they can do their roles effectively and efficiently, in support of the book of work you have signed up for.

© Michael C. Simonelli, onthegocio.com, 2013